Harrisonburg’s Election 2018

Download a printable copy of the Harrisonburg Voter Guide,  produced by the James Madison Center for Civic Engagement and the students in JMU Professor Andreas Broscheid’s honors political science class, who developed the questions for the candidates and compiled all the answers. The guide includes all the candidates’ answers to questions about their qualifications, priorities and key issues, such as health care, immigration, guns, student debt and local taxes and budgeting.

Harrisonburg voters will be selected candidates on Nov. 6 for four offices: a U.S. Senate seat, the 6th Congressional District seat, two city council positions and three school board members.

For even more about the candidates’ backgrounds and positions on key issues, check out The Citizen’s coverage of those contests:

CITY COUNCIL:2018citycouncilFEATURE

In EMU forum, city council candidates agree on concepts, separate themselves on details” (Oct. 31)

Hburg council candidates reveal differences over priorities, ‘unpopular’ decisions and even scooters” (Oct. 17)

Changing approach to jail can save money and improve lives, residents and activists say” (Oct. 16) With video.

Council candidates try to connect with students” (Oct. 11)

Council candidates offer different philosophies in ways they should—and can—help immigrants” (Oct. 8)

Independent candidates are running from the right and the left in this fall’s election” (Oct. 3)

The Citizen’s CANDIDATE PROFILES: 

Carolyn Frank, independent

Chris Jones, Democrat

Frank McMillan, independent

Sal Romero, Democrat

Paloma Saucedo, independent

 

6th CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: 

As 6th Congressional race wraps up, Cline goes after Lewis’s position on health care” (Nov. 1)

JMU students give job interviews to U.S. Senate, 6th Congressional District candidates”  (Oct. 11)

In traveling town hall, candidates seek to appeal to JMU students—an untapped well of mid-term voters” (Oct. 5)

 

U.S. SENATE RACE: 

JMU students give job interviews to U.S. Senate, 6th Congressional District candidates”  (Oct. 11)

In traveling town hall, candidates seek to appeal to JMU students—an untapped well of mid-term voters” (Oct. 5)

 

Acknowledgements:

The Student-Created Voter Education Guide is brought to you by:

Students of Professor Andreas Broscheid’s Honors Political Science Class: Sophie Brause, Calvin Chenault, Kasey Clayton, Grant Colip, Kathleen Connor, Madison Dobscha, Madalyn Ferlazzo, Makeda Fikremariam, Michael Friedman, Aliyah Hall, Charlie Hines, Meredith Lawing, Abby Maltese, Eric Maxwell, Lindsey Monito, Riya Patel, Zach Pennycuff, Lauren Slaughter, William Tyler Strosnider, Ben Uehlinger; and by staff of the James Madison Center for Civic Engagement: Ysabella Chua (Design and Layout), Dr. Carah Ong Whaley.