Category: COVID-19 info

Page 2/7

Residents find outdoor refuge in city parks, but Westover pool and other rec facilities’ reopening remain uncertain

While the Parks and Recreation Department has kept open access to trails and fields on its properties, its programming has shifted online and other oft-used facilities, such as the Westover skatepark and all the parks’ playground equipment, remained locked or roped off. The Parks and Recreation department is also unsure as to how and when certain facilities will open up, including the Westover Pool. Parks and Rec employees plan on discussing that in meetings this week.

Advertisement

Volunteers harness ingenuity and 3-D printers to make 2,800 face shields for health workers and first responders

Donating 1,200 clear plastic face shields to Sentara Rockingham Memorial Hospital was already a big undertaking, but a local group of volunteers with access to 3-D printers has kept going — producing protective equipment to donate to organizations and first responders, including more than 250 face shields to the Harrisonburg Fire Department.

Advertisement

The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

As federal funds arrive, some Harrisonburg residents, businesses and agencies are getting a little relief

Millions of dollars from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security, or CARES Act, will trickle into Harrisonburg over the coming months in various forms — through money to the city government, as stimulus checks and unemployment payments to residents and as loans and grants to businesses and organizations.

Advertisement

Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

COVID-19 testing increases in Virginia, but officials still can’t provide testing rate in Harrisonburg

The ability to test for COVID-19 and the accessibility of testing are increasing in Virginia this month, health department officials said Wednesday. The Virginia Department of Health held a teleconferenced press briefing Wednesday and reported that capacity has steadily increased over the last few weeks between public health, hospital and commercial labs, said Michael Keatts, the Virginia Department of Health’s Northwest emergency health coordinator.

Advertisement

As pandemic’s fiscal impact becomes painfully clear, city announces layoffs and other cost-saving measures

By March 13, when the health department announced Harrisonburg’s first positive test for COVID-19 and local schools were on a one-day closure that soon extended through the academic year, it was clear that the pandemic’s effects on public health and the economy would be dramatic. On Monday, city staff put some first numbers to that bleak picture in a late-afternoon press release: local tax revenue will fall an estimated $4 million short of projections for this fiscal year, which ends June 30.

Advertisement

School therapy provider accustomed to adaptation

In a public school setting where students vastly outnumber teachers, some children need more support than what the school’s personnel can provide. For more than a decade in Harrisonburg, this gap has been filled by government-supported in-school therapy, known as Therapeutic Day Treatment. Now that schools are closed for the remainder of the academic year, though, providers are scrambling to find ways to reach the students who need them.

Advertisement

In conference call, Sen. Warner hears about successful steps and continued anxiety over COVID-19 in Hburg

On April 29, six weeks after the passage of the federal CARES Act, Sen. Mark Warner (D) spoke by phone with several business and community leaders in Harrisonburg, including Mayor Deanna Reed and JMU President Jonathan Alger. The virtual meeting was one in a series of calls Warner has been holding with leaders across Virginia to hear how their communities have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Advertisement

City’s trend of COVID cases improving, but officials remain concerned about vulnerable populations

Harrisonburg could be seeing “the light at the end of the tunnel” in the rate of COVID-19 infections, the deputy emergency coordinator reported to city council Tuesday. Meanwhile, state health officials are considering making available locality-level testing data.

Advertisements

Advertisement

Hosting & Maintenance by eSaner