Category: Harrisonburg Issues

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Shoppers visit downtown retailers for Small Business Saturday

Heather Brown has done some Christmas shopping online this year, but on Saturday she was among the steady stream of shoppers who visited Harrisonburg’s downtown stores and restaurants. Brown, of Harrisonburg, said she was not aware it was Small Business Saturday, but wanted to support the local businesses just the same.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

One night in Harrisonburg, a legendary Swedish band went out in a blaze of glory

And so, in early October, Refused – an iconic band now routinely described as “hardcore legends” and “sonic revolutionaries” – ended up at The 401 House, a brick ranch on South High Street that was then a staple house venue in the city’s punk scene.

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With success from video series, environmental coalition looks to future activism

A Harrisonburg-based coalition that focused on environmental issues during this fall’s political campaigns is now harnessing momentum from its “One Minute for Earth” video campaign and is shifting its focus to future efforts.

The good, the bad and the ‘trending in the right direction’ of Hburg High School’s online learning

Earlier this fall, the percentage of Fs in Harrisonburg High School classes was more than twice as high as usual. So officials had an intervention. Meanwhile, while some students have found mostly online learning to be challenging, other students have thrived in unexpected ways.

Study shows the extent of Hburg’s housing crunch

The types of housing units available in Harrisonburg — and the competitiveness of the housing market — particularly disadvantages lower-income residents, which the initial findings of a comprehensive housing study confirmed.

Harrisonburg schools want to bring more students back to the classroom

In the wake of some students’ struggles to adapt to online learning, the Harrisonburg City Public Schools are working on a plan to bring more of them back into classrooms in the coming weeks, with priority given to the youngest students.

Innovative local farm serves as a classroom for area students

“Soil is meant to be covered,” reads the stitching on Rockingham County farmer Mike Phillips’ hat. Along with his wife, Susan, Phillips owns Valley View Farm, where they raise cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs and pay special mind to soil heath through the use of cover crops, rotational grazing, and no-till planting techniques. For four years, the farm has partnered with Rockingham County Public Schools (RCPS) and Massanutten Technical Center’s (MTC) Agriculture Program. The growing program currently enrolls 26 students in the 10th through 12th grades from RCPS, Eastern Mennonite School, Harrisonburg City Schools as well as homeschooled students. The farm has been Phillips’ family for well over a century.

With demand unabated , local groups continue supporting newcomers to the area

When Omar Al Sadoon told the case worker from the Department of Social Services that he wanted work as an electrician, she was incredulous. It was too much, Omar recalls her saying. He needed much better English and training in U.S. electrical standards before he could think about getting a job as an electrical tradesman in Virginia.

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