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Mennonite Groundhog Day

The groundhogs are everywhere. They are stuffed toys sitting amongst dishes of sauerkraut and jars of pickled eggs laid out on tables. A portrait painting of one is propped reverently on the piano in the corner, beside a makeshift shrine where an opened can of birch beer sits in offering. There’s a crockpot of barbecued groundhog, according to the handwritten sign.

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Rare records show the Lincoln Homestead’s history with slavery

The records, or what are left of the records, are yellowing and difficult to read. These matter-of-fact lists tell only names and ages of the people who were born and lived and died in chattel slavery serving the Virginia relatives of President Abraham Lincoln. And then they place a monetary value on each person.

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

A star in the East Rock

While we don’t know exactly where East Rockingham’s standout sophomore, Tyler Nickel, will rank in the final reckoning of top prep basketball players from the area, it’s becoming more and more clear that he will be in that conversation by the time he graduates in two and a half years.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Council still unsure what course to take with Heritage Oaks

The Harrisonburg City Council wrestled with the fate of the publicly owned Heritage Oaks Golf Course — but made no decisions — during Tuesday’s meeting as Parks and Recreation staff offered an overview of the course’s finances and operations.

The northward march: entrepreneurs expanding Harrisonburg’s downtown scene

By Kyle Kirby, contributor The northern end of downtown Harrisonburg is abuzz with renovations, as more and more restaurants and businesses set up shop just north of Court Square. The Frame Factory established its Liberty Street location in 2016, and their neighbor Mashita, the local Korean food truck favorite, cut the ribbon on a brick-and-mortar …

City’s estimated population falls for second consecutive year, thanks to the economy

One year’s slight population decline could be a blip. But two years in a row – as is now the case in Harrisonburg, according to the Weldon Cooper Center – looks more like a trend.

Hey Elderly Aunt, our daughter wants to protest climate change. Should we let her skip school to do it?

Dear Elderly Aunt, Our 6th grader and 3rd grader have become increasingly interested in the environment and trying to stop climate change. They’ve been especially inspired by Greta Thunberg. Now our 6th grade daughter has suggested skipping school to protest climate change like Greta did. We’ve tried to steer her toward other actions, like writing letters and making posters. What kind of strategies would you suggest that would be effective ways for young students like her to send a message … without missing school to do it? — Proud Parents

Community perspective: Harrisonburg as a playwriting center

Harrisonburg has inspired a surprising number of playwrights, TV and screen writers in Hollywood and New York City. The story began with JMU’s first playwrighting course taught in 1975, when Professor Roger Allen Hall joined the faculty of the new theatre program. Just four years later his student Phoef Sutton won the first National Norman Lear Comedy Award for his play “The Pendragon Institute.”

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