Author: Randi B. Hagi

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City schools begin bracing for a new year of online and in-person teaching and learning

Superintendent Michael Richards told the School Board Tuesday that the city schools might rely on a hybrid system of remote and in-person learning in the fall, but school officials are waiting for the state to release guidelines for reopening schools.

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Decriminalization of marijuana possession won’t necessarily affect those already caught up in the system

Simple possession of an ounce or less of marijuana is set to be decriminalized in Virginia on July 1. But that won’t prevent Harrisonburg resident Christopher Jones, a cook at O’Neill’s Grill, from being sent to jail later that month if it’s what the prosecutor seeks.

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Hundreds rally for peace in the wake of George Floyd’s death

About 300 people, donning face masks and holding signs, gathered at Court Square in Harrisonburg on Friday evening to speak out against racism and police brutality following the death of George Floyd, who died Monday after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck.

Poultry worker advocates urge city council to act after spike in COVID-19 cases

Concern about the spread of COVID-19 in area poultry plants came to the forefront of Tuesday’s Harrisonburg City Council meeting, as 12 city residents representing a variety of grassroots organizations petitioned the council to ask Gov. Ralph Northam to dial back reopening of businesses in order to protect workers.

Amid money crunch, school board cuts $1.2 mil. in new positions from budget

Harrisonburg City Public Schools is slowing the expansion of district-wide staff in response to expected revenue losses because of the pandemic. To this end, the Harrisonburg School Board, during its Tuesday work session, tentatively approved a first draft of budget revisions that takes out planned positions.

Council cuts funding for golf course

The Heritage Oaks Golf Course would take a 36.5% cut in city funding, following the Harrisonburg City Council’s latest version of the 2021 budget, which got its first reading at Tuesday’s meeting.

As federal funds arrive, some Harrisonburg residents, businesses and agencies are getting a little relief

Millions of dollars from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security, or CARES Act, will trickle into Harrisonburg over the coming months in various forms — through money to the city government, as stimulus checks and unemployment payments to residents and as loans and grants to businesses and organizations.

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