Author: Randi B. Hagi

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As local judicial system grows, so does Court Services – a wide-ranging collection of programs for those not yet, no longer or hopefully never behind bars

In the shuffle of renovations last spring to add more courtrooms to the judicial complex downtown, the Court Services department got bumped a few blocks north to the county administration building on Gay Street – to the chagrin of local attorney Aaron Cook. Sounds cool, but what are Court Services?

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2nd Amendment sanctuary supporters get vocal as council discusses resolution

Tensions flared at Tuesday’s packed city council meeting as proponents of a resolution to declare the city a Second Amendment sanctuary shouted at council members to urge them to act. While that issue was up for discussion only — and not a vote Tuesday — the council did take action to approve the first phase of the Environmental Action Plan and also heard a plan for the Daily News-Record’s building, although delayed voting rezoning request for it.

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Linville-Edom school’s legacy fuels efforts to keep it open

It started by community members walking down a country road with a wheel attached to the end of a pole. The people who walked that 1.3 miles in the early 1900s, from the town of Linville to that of Edom, counted the number of times the wheel revolved, divided it in two, and thus decided the location of the present-day Linville-Edom Elementary School.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Lucy Simms book will arrive soon; School board considering review of teacher compensation

Social studies coordinators for Harrisonburg City and Rockingham County schools announced in a school board meeting on Thursday that a soon-to-be-released biography of local educator Lucy Simms will be on the shelves of area schools later this year.

By 3-2 vote, council approves Plan A for the new high school design that includes athletic facilities

The Harrisonburg City Council narrowly approved the construction of the new high school as originally designed on Tuesday evening – with the athletics facilities included — allowing builders to break ground in time for the $87.2 million building to open in fall 2022.

It all comes down to tonight. Council’s decision on new school will decide when it opens and how it’s built.

To stay on schedule for opening the new high school in fall 2022, the City Council will have to authorize Nielsen Builders, Inc. to break ground this month. That has raised the stakes for tonight’s public hearing and vote — potentially the last chance for council to approve a design so that the builders can proceed on time or risk delaying the new school’s opening by a year.

More students are expected in Hburg schools, board learns. What will that mean for a new high school?

While the fate of the proposed new high school rests with the City Council, the Harrisonburg school board members learned Tuesday they should brace for a larger-than-expected influx of students over the next five years.

To allow for public input, council delays vote on new high school’s design to Dec. 10

The Harrisonburg City Council postponed a vote on the new high school’s design until Dec. 10 to allow for a public hearing, while city council members also continue looking for ways to soften the blow on residents’ tax bills.

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