Author: Randi B. Hagi

Page 8/14

Randi has worked in the downtown restaurant scene, nonprofit sector, in horse care and as a freelance writer and photographer since graduating from Eastern Mennonite University in 2014. Randi's work has been featured on WMRA News, The Mennonite, and EMU's Crossroads magazine. She also runs a small muscovy duck egg business out of her “farmette” in Hinton. Hagi’s roots are in West Virginia, but she can’t seem to let go of Rockingham County.

Schools’ dual language program is in high demand and ripe for expansion, board members say

Harrisonburg City Public Schools’ original class of “dual language” students — the ones who started as kindergarteners in 2010 — began high school this fall. And now the school board and staff are looking toward expanding the program that is attracting more applicants than available spots each year.

Advertisement

New campaign bypasses minimum wage debate by praising companies that pay workers more

Instead of lobbying for policy changes in Richmond and Washington, a new group is pushing for raising workers’ pay by gathering voluntary commitments from — and cheering on — local employers that pay their staff a “living wage.”

Advertisement

The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Council takes next step toward major re-routing of University Boulevard

With an eye toward improving the ability to get around Harrisonburg, the City Council gave the go-ahead for the Department of Public Works to seek state grant money for a pair of projects on different sides of town — a major re-routing of University Boulevard east of JMU’s campus and construction of sidewalks on the north part of Main Street.

Advertisement

Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Woman who was tased and charged with felonies after police responded to a noise complaint at her apartment found not guilty on all counts

A woman facing two felonies after a controversial altercation with police last December has been cleared of all charges. Melissa Duncan, charged with two counts of assault of a police officer and a misdemeanor obstruction of justice charge, was found not guilty on Wednesday afternoon after a contentious trial on Tuesday.

Advertisement

On 1st day of school, Medicaid change results in tenfold decrease in Harrisonburg High students approved for key mental health and behavior program

Harrisonburg students attended their first day of classes Tuesday, but because of a change in Medicaid approvals, some of them walked into school with less support than they had last year. 

Advertisement

Before a new season of college parties, city council tightens noise ordinance

In time for college students’ return to Harrisonburg for the fall, the city council on Tuesday unanimously approved changes to the noise ordinance aimed at massive parties. The new amendments include tightening restrictions on party organizers from getting a new permit if they become repeat offenders — either for noise or underage drinking.    

Advertisement

Parents of special needs students hope schools’ focus on inclusion will increase — especially once new high school opens

Oliver Stephan is a 17 year old who enjoys biking, has a knack for algebra, and recently studied cell biology with a local college graduate. He also has a non-speaking form of autism, so he communicates in other ways – he spoke to The Citizen by pointing out letters on a board to spell out sentences.

Advertisement

One high school will focus on STEM, the other on fine arts. Here’s how plans for a new high school are taking shape. 

Harrisonburg’s new high school will be built with an eye toward providing a focus on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), while the existing high school will emphasize fine arts, school officials announced Tuesday. 

Advertisements

Advertisement

Hosting & Maintenance by eSaner