COVID-19 vaccines given to residents of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County
Harrisonburg and Rockingham County population that is fully vaccinated

Category: Harrisonburg Issues

Page 3/76

JMU 2020 grads will finally get their graduation – if they go

A year and four months after earning their degrees, JMU’s class of 2020 will walk the stage Sept. 3. The graduates will become the first class to move their tassels at the Atlantic Union Bank Center, which opened in Nov. 2020. But some alumni feel it’s too little, too late.

Advertisement

Dedication will honor railway worker who sought to ‘go out with his boots on’

Walter P. “Tinky” Bryan’s life was nourished by his work and his dedication to the railroad. In some ways, he delayed death by delaying retirement from an industry that has always had an age limit of 65.But Bryan, the very epitome of the lunchpail-toting everyman, was, in the end, mortal.

Advertisement

Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

SRO task force meeting gets a little testy

Representatives from the Harrisonburg Police Department provided their perspective Wednesday night to the Harrisonburg City Public Schools’ task force that’s evaluating the role of school resource officers and were met with a mixture of appreciation, skepticism, support — and some pushback.

Advertisement

City news roundup: New school’s cost expected to go up; HEC to end electric rate discounts

Because of building materials’ rising costs, Harrisonburg’s second high school could cost an additional $7.7 million, according to an estimate presented to city and school district leaders Tuesday.

Just how much did last year set the city’s budget back?

Larry Propst, by his own admission, is not an economist. His job, as city director of finance, is to help set the city budget — he calls it “entirely different” from the work of an economist. And on March 14, 2020 — a Saturday — Propst watched as the city of Harrisonburg declared a state of emergency as COVID-19 spread nationwide. Over the next several months, Harrisonburg administrators — Propst’s office included — would watch the city’s finances plummet as tax revenue from restaurants, hotels and other businesses shriveled. Within weeks, millions of city tax dollars vanished.

Partnership offers a path to homeownership and sustainable energy

Charly Ngeleka spent his Friday afternoon on a scaffold, lifting solar panels up to the installation team on the roof. He and another half-dozen volunteers were working on a partially-finished duplex in Harrisonburg, one being built by the Central Valley Habitat for Humanity. When completed, it’ll become Ngeleka’s home.

With national recognition, Harrisonburg author NoNieqa Ramos extends her literary activism

Being the author of a book that the Library of Congress will showcase might sound like the ultimate honor, but that’s not how Harrisonburg writer NoNieqa Ramos defines success. Ramos views her job as something much more important: “inventing young people.”

Area groups work to help vulnerable populations get vaccinated

While COVID-19 vaccinations have become widely available, several Harrisonburg organizations have stepped up efforts to help people in vulnerable communities — including immigrants and refugees, as well as those experiencing homelessness — overcome hurdles to get vaccinated.

Hosting & Maintenance by eSaner

Thanks for reading The Citizen!

We're glad you enjoy The Citizen! We work hard to publish one news story every weekday, and depend heavily on reader support to do that. We keep our overhead low; 85 cents of every dollar we spend pays local writers to cover local news in our lovely local community. Thanks for your support.