Tag: jails

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How will 2020 shape Hburg’s future? Let’s play Twenty Questions

And so it begins. Hopes for and speculation about the future abound, as does list-making for a fresh year. As we set off for the next 12 months, get ready for plenty of “20/20 vision” references. In that spirit, here are 20 questions (in no particular order) for 2020 that address issues that will likely shape Harrisonburg for the next decade and beyond.

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Stories of hope, gratitude, tributes, sustainability and homelessness in Hburg dominated in 2019

The waning days of the year offer an opportunity for reflection — a quick check of what happened in the previous 12 months and how the community changed for better or worse. Of all the stories The Citizen published in 2019, these were the most shared, read and buzzed-about of the year.

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Strength in Peers hopes to extend reach in the Valley to help with addiction, homelessness

Strength in Peers — the resource center devoted to helping people recover from substance abuse, mental illness and homelessness — opened a new location in Luray last week as it seeks to expand its reach across the Valley.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

City spending on incarceration continues to climb

Harrisonburg’s total cost to prosecute, try and incarcerate people has risen by $1.8 million – roughly 29 percent – over the past five years, according to city finance documents.

In EMU forum, city council candidates agree on concepts, separate themselves on details

The five city council candidates spent much of Tuesday night’s forum agreeing with one another on issues like completing the Northend Greenway and police recruitment and retention, while still seeking to distinguish themselves through nuances in their answers.  

Changing approach to jails can save money and improve lives, residents and activists say

As a crowd gathered on the corner of High and Market Streets Monday evening, Jennifer Davis Sensenig, president of Faith in Action, urged the more than 80 people to march and make their case for local justice reform.

“We’re coming in force because we think the [CCJB] has the power to make local changes,” Sensenig said. The crowd responded with cheers.

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