Author: Ian Munro

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One woman wanted to expand her daycare to address the area’s ‘childcare desert.’ She got blocked by her own driveway.

Even though available childcare remains scarce around Harrisonburg, only nine applications for special permits to expand child-care facilities have been filed in the city and Rockingham County since 2015.

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As police still investigate racist fliers dropped at Bridgewater College, media continues to wrestle with coverage of it

On the way to class Monday, Nov. 26, a Bridgewater College student found half-a-dozen baggies along Dinkel Avenue — right by the college — that contained fliers espousing racist and anti-Semitic sentiments, the latest in a string of instances in Virginia over the last year.

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Tougher than dry turkey? How Hburg residents plan to tackle awkward political discussions this Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner for some families doesn’t just involve occasionally competing over turkey legs or the wishbone. It can mean fighting over Donald Trump and Nancy Pelosi, immigration policy and climate change, CNN and Fox News. Around here though, Harrisonburg residents told The Citizen they have some strategies to navigate those touchy political topics this Thanksgiving.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Despite Harrisonburg’s status as a ‘childcare desert,’ day care providers’ expansion plans keep getting sent to time-outs

While two day care operators cleared a key hurdle in their effort to expand the number of spots for children of working families, their win was short-lived. And their saga has underscored the complex process day care providers must navigate to create more spots to for children, even as working families across Harrisonburg and beyond scramble to get on waiting lists for safe places to send their children during workdays. 

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Brent Finnegan campaign. Paid for by Friends of Brent Finnegan.

Frank wants to return to council to keep Hburg from becoming ‘unaffordable’

Independent council candidate Carolyn Frank, who served as Harrisonburg’s first female mayor, is running again on a platform highlighting her concerns about rising taxes and costs, which she says could force people and businesses out of the city.

As 6th congressional race wraps up, Cline goes after Lewis’s position on health care

As Republican Ben Cline heads into Election Night as the favorite to succeed U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte in the 6th District, Cline is going on offense with an ad criticizing Democratic opponent Jennifer Lewis’s position on health care.

Council candidates try to connect with JMU students

The five city council candidates tried Wednesday evening to appeal to bloc of potential voters that often eludes them—especially in midterm election years. But even the students who showed up to the Traveling Town Hall stop at JMU’s Grace Street Apartments weren’t exactly sure, at least at first, how the city council affects them.

Phillip Wong, a junior psychology major, was one of the few students to ask any questions of the council candidates: Democrats Chris Jones and Sal Romero Jr. and independents Carolyn Frank, Frank McMillan and Paloma Saucedo. The five are vying for two spots on the council.

Independent council candidates are running from the right and left in this fall’s election

This November, Harrisonburg voters will choose two candidates for city council out of a field of five: two Democrats, three independents but, for the second straight election, no Republican. A Republican last ran for city council seat in 2014. 

Still, two of the independent candidates – Frank McMillan and Carolyn Frank – have embraced certain conservative philosophies, such as wanting to reduce the tax burden. A third independent, Paloma Saucedo, is running on a progressive platform. 

That has the Democratic candidates – Chris Jones and Sal Romero –  facing independent opposition from both ends of the political spectrum. 

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