Author: Sukainah Abid-Kons

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With uncertainty about classes, a few JMU and EMU students opt for a gap semester (or longer)

When Alexa Lorenzana found out the way EMU would be holding classes partially online and partially in person this fall, the rising EMU junior decided to take a semester off and work instead.

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What’s in a name? When it comes to Hburg streets, it’s sometimes hard to tell

The city council on Tuesday will review street naming policies. As for existing streets, efforts to rename them aren’t on the council’s agenda. And a closer look at the history of those names shows more mystery than certainty thanks to a lack of official record-keeping and a hodge-podge of ways Harrisonburg streets were named in the past.

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Black Lives Matter signs pop up across Hburg, surpassing group’s early expectations

What began as a plan to distribute 100 “Black Lives Matter” signs has increased to more than six-fold since June, as demand for signs across the city continues to rise.

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Just how much of a surprise was the decision to scrap the Atlantic Coast Pipeline?

Last Thursday, a Dominion Energy media relations representative talked with The Citizen for 22 minutes about the future of the long-debated and controversial Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which just a few weeks earlier had cleared a major hurdle in the U.S. Supreme Court. There was no hint of what Dominion and Duke would announce three days later.

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Another financial effect of the pandemic: international students’ only employment options

As a lesser-publicized consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, many colleges and universities stopped paying for certain on-campus work-study jobs when classes shifted online in March. For many of these students, the checks that were supposed to come until May abruptly ended two months early, creating a cash crunch for those students — and uncertainty about regaining those work-study positions in the fall.

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What happens when the head of a retirement community gets diagnosed with COVID-19?

When Rodney Alderfer, president of the Bridgewater Retirement Community, found out he had tested positive for COVID-19 on June 2, he knew that he and the senior leadership team with whom he worked had to quarantine for two weeks to protect each other, as well as the community’s residents — who, because of their age, are among those most at risk.

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JMU students lead silent march to turn up volume on calls to end systemic racism and remove confederates’ names from buildings

In leading a protest march Friday that was both silent and loud, JMU students — joined by university employees and community members — called on the university to step up its response to systemic racism, starting with removing the names of confederate leaders from three of its buildings.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

For local artists, pandemic has created struggles but also a ‘coronaissance’

Local rapper Gabriel Curry started using the term “coronaissance” as a joke term with friends as a way to describe the effect that the global pandemic was having on local art and culture. But it soon became apparent it was more than a joke. Something was happening.

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