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Daily News-Record building listed for sale

A historic downtown building that houses an equally prominent local institution has been put up for sale. Last Wednesday, the Daily News-Record building at 231 South Liberty Street was placed on the market. The move mirrors that of many local and national papers that have sold their historic headquarters. 

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Friendly City Food Co-op

A life saved and a spontaneous act of gratitude could lead to more rescue celebrations

To say that Brad Schlabach is grateful to be alive would be a significant understatement. His wife, Jayne, takes it a little further.

“It’s a miracle,” she proclaims.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Long-polluted Blacks Run is making a comeback. Ducks and fish love it. Now a new program can spur residents to help

Earlier this year, Wes Runion, Harrisonburg’s environmental specialist, was taking a sample of water from Blacks Run off of Pleasant Valley Road when he had a surprise encounter.

Familiar opponents Wilt and Finnegan gear up for the fall’s 26th District race in a different political environment

Republican Del. Tony Wilt and his Democratic challenger Brent Finnegan go way back — well beyond the last time they ran against each other in 2017.

What should the new high school be like? Survey shows Hburg residents have a range of opinions

The new high school’s appearance, function and feel are starting to take shape in meetings of the school board-appointed design committee. But other questions — such as how students will be divided between the two schools and whether each will offer the same programs — have ignited public debate, including at a public meeting May 23 and on Facebook.

Short-term rentals like Airbnbs are causing long-term concerns and even longer public meetings

As Harrisonburg continues its experiment with how to regulate Airbnb properties and other short-term rentals, the planning commission — and city council — are now wrestling with how to fairly decide who gets a permit and how to do so efficiently and with the fewest unintended consequences.

While debate over local criminal justice continues, voters won’t have much say on top law enforcement jobs this fall

Last Tuesday’s primary election day was also deadline day: the last opportunity for candidates to file paperwork to run for local constitutional offices — such as sheriff and commonwealths’ attorney — that will appear on this November’s ballot. Aside from the incumbents, however, no one else did, meaning Commonwealth’s Attorney Marsha Garst and Sheriff Bryan Hutcheson, both Republicans, will be unopposed in their reelection campaigns once again and are all but assured of serving again until 2023.

Hey Elderly Aunt, is it possible to engage about politics on social media without drowning in a cesspool of hate and lies?

One reader wants to know how to avoid the nasty muck of political discussions on social media. so the Elderly Aunt offers her prescription for avoiding Reactive Social Media Posting Disorder.

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