COVID-19 vaccines given to residents of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County
Harrisonburg and Rockingham County population that is fully vaccinated

Tag: renewable energy

Page 1/1

Statewide environmental news roundup – May 2021

Pipeline controversies continue. What should happen after cancellation of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP) to property seized under eminent domain and through agreements with landowners? The same question pertains to land seized for the Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP). Two Roanoke landowners sued for just compensation and received a jury award for considerably more than the MVP owners wanted to give.

Advertisement

City’s pursuit of clean energy sets ambitious goals, raises some questions

While formally calling for a transition to 100% clean electricity in 15 years, the city council has placed Harrisonburg in the middle of an ongoing debate over how electric utilities can move away from power sources that burn gasses contributing to global warming.

Advertisement

Council approves solar farm as well as bonuses for city workers

The Harrisonburg City Council made a few steps toward increasing residents’ access to solar and wind energy on Tuesday night, as council members unanimously approved the lease for a solar farm on the north end of town, and adopted a resolution that aims to have 50% of the city’s electricity come from renewable energy by 2025.

Advertisement

Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Statewide environmental news roundup – October 2020

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approved a two-year extension for completing the Mountain Valley Pipeline’s (MVP), as MVP owners are seeking FERC permission to resume construction. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reissued three permits for an MVP “path across nearly 1,000 streams and wetlands.” Environmental groups have sued over a U.S. Fish & Wildlife service “biological opinion” concerning MVP construction’s impact on endangered species.

Harrisonburg’s electric utility is charting a roadmap to encourage solar power. What are the options?

After deciding earlier this summer on a policy to continue crediting customerswho install solar panels, the members of the Harrisonburg Electric Commission made it clear that their conversation about solar energy’s future in Harrisonburg wasn’t done — but was just starting.

Electric commission draws a record crowd — and sighs of relief from solar advocates. Now the utility is working on its next steps toward renewable energy

It’s not often that the Harrisonburg Electric Commission’s monthly meeting attracts a standing-room-only crowd. Yet, Tuesday morning, more than 20 people crammed into the small conference room at the utility’s Operations Center on North Liberty Street. Some were solar installers, dressed in bright-colored t-shirts with their employers’ logo emblazoned on them. Others were solar advocates or homeowners with arrays on their houses.

Harrisonburg’s draft Environmental Action Plan goes public – minus a focus on renewable energy

On Wednesday evening, several dozen gathered downtown to get into the weeds of the city’s latest push to go green. It’s an effort that will be guided by an Environmental Action Plan (EAP), a sustainability roadmap being developed by city staff along with the city’s appointed Environmental Performance Standards Advisory Committee (EPSAC).

Valley Friends Meeting sees solar as better stewardship

Part of Quakers’ beliefs include stewardship and – upon listening to the divine within themselves and others – the group began to feel a need to do something about climate destabilization. In 2014, they put out a statement to invite other religious groups and communities to make an effort toward reducing their carbon footprint on the environment. Having already done an energy audit on their meeting house, one member said, “Are we going to put our money where our mouth is?”

Hosting & Maintenance by eSaner

Thanks for reading The Citizen!

We're glad you enjoy The Citizen! We work hard to publish one news story every weekday, and depend heavily on reader support to do that. We keep our overhead low; 85 cents of every dollar we spend pays local writers to cover local news in our lovely local community. Thanks for your support.