COVID-19 vaccines given to residents of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County
Harrisonburg and Rockingham County population that is fully vaccinated

Author: Andrew Jenner

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After police response to weekend gathering turns ugly, community members will rally Thursday to seek answers 

Community members, led by the local NAACP chapter, will rally at Court Square at 1 p.m. Thursday to call for answers about Harrisonburg Police officers’ handling of the break-up of a party early Sunday, which led to officers using their tasers on a woman multiple times before arresting her.

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The forthcoming county bird checklist includes 301 species and everyone should be excited about it!

Snowy Owls, flamingos — you never know what kind of birds you might encounter in the Shenandoah Valley. However, on the eve of the annual Rockingham County Christmas Bird Count, a group of eagle-eyed bird watchers have a pretty good idea of which ones have been through the area — for now.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

As momentum grows for I-81 upgrades, lawmakers prepare to pick between tolls and taxes to cover the $2 billion cost

Toll or tax? That’s a question that state legislators will begin debating next month when the General Assembly convenes for its 2019 session. At issue is Interstate 81 – the increasingly congested, dangerous and routinely backed-up artery that carries hundreds of billions of dollars in goods each year straight through Harrisonburg and western Virginia.

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There’s broad agreement that I-81 is broke and needs fixin’ – but how to pay for it?

On Saturday afternoon, Senator Mark Warner-D swung by the Hotel Madison for an hour-long talk on everything from passing a federal budget to the “really dark underbelly” of the modern social media landscape. One of the more Harrisonburg-specific issues that got plenty of attention was fixing I-81.

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As new police chief reviews policies, bikers call for stronger protections

After running an errand late one morning in August, Brenda Diaz-Castro was biking back downtown along South Main Street. Just after she crossed Port Republic Road heading north toward JMU, a car drifted into the bike lane she was in and sideswiped her.

A blue wave crests in Harrisonburg

The statewide election storyline of large turnouts and good results for Democrats was mirrored in Harrisonburg last night, with Democrats Sal Romero and Chris Jones comfortably elected to city council in a five-way race against three Independents running on often-diverging platforms.

Around 1,000 city residents face a sudden end to their legal status in the country

Carlos Ramos unfolded the green piece of paper he’d pulled from his wallet and waved it before the small crowd that had gathered at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church. It was his property tax bill that just came from the city. He’s paid it for years, and on Monday, held it up as a sort of Harrisonburg membership card.

If they vote, JMU students could be wildcards in local elections

A close look at returns suggests that JMU students – or at least those who live and vote on campus – aren’t the city’s most reliably Democratic voters.

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