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Some city board applicants don’t fill out their paperwork but get appointed anyway. The council is considering changing that.

Harrisonburg City Council members will consider establishing a clearer process for making appointments to city boards and commissions after the issue arose for the third council meeting in a row Tuesday night.  

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Valley Friends Meeting sees solar as better stewardship

Part of Quakers’ beliefs include stewardship and – upon listening to the divine within themselves and others – the group began to feel a need to do something about climate destabilization. In 2014, they put out a statement to invite other religious groups and communities to make an effort toward reducing their carbon footprint on the environment. Having already done an energy audit on their meeting house, one member said, “Are we going to put our money where our mouth is?”

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Six years ago, residents made the case for a Martin Luther King Jr. Way. Here’s how one man says it paved the way for more progress.

In 2013, Stan Maclin — joined by like-minded citizens — began making appeals to the Harrisonburg City Council to rename a street after civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. “There was no reflection of the accomplishments of an African American in the 20th century,” he said.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

After Obenshain, Landes introduce legislation to begin tolling I-81, truckers gear up in opposition

Now that valley-area legislators introduced companion bills calling for tolls to fund $2.2 billion upgrades to I-81, the plan’s supporters will face staunch opposition led by truckers, who say the proposal will unfairly target them and will cause a ripple effect in the economy. 

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School officials will ask council on Feb. 12 to approve starting new high school design phase

The Feb. 12 City Council meeting will be when school board officials present the updated construction cost estimates to city council members so they can consider how quickly to move forward with the new high school building.  

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As shutdown drags on, Shenandoah National Park keeps portions open. But it’s getting tougher.

While Shenandoah National Park is open to the public, only a few bathrooms are open and no services or help would be available if someone gets hurt or stranded on the mountain. Volunteers and park-related groups are trying to fill in the gaps with clean-ups and paying for portable bathrooms.

His last race inspired a law to protect student email addresses. Now Del. Wilt seeks to undo unintended headaches it caused

As the General Assembly gets down to business, Del. Tony Wilt has introduced a bill to undo an inadvertent hassle that one of his bills from 2018 has imposed on Virginia public college campuses.

New feature: Advice from the Elderly Aunt who’s been around the block (Episode 1 — Is listening to other points of view overrated?)

The Elderly Aunt offers her thoughtful responses to your questions about this wild ride we call life (just please, no financial questions). Her column will run on the second and fourth Monday of each month. To get the Elderly Aunt’s advice, email your question to [email protected] with the subject line “Elderly Aunt question.” 

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