Author: Holly Marcus

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First signs of spring

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Tearing down walls: A trip through time in one of Harrisonburg’s first “new” public schools

In 1878, the school board decided that Harrisonburg needed a “large and more modern building” due to the “increasing number of scholars.” The old academy was razed and a seven-room brick structure went up in its place. The following year, a new brick schoolhouse opened on South Main Street. Cost: $5,000.

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The Hub. Co-working in downtown Harrisonburg.

Animal lovers divided on how to handle feral cats that roam the area

Bundled in a heavy coat, a woman sits in a picnic shelter at Hillandale Park. Five large, healthy cats dine on plates of cat food scattered around her. She and several other caretakers come twice a day to feed these “homeless” cats, as she calls them. She doesn’t want to be identified; she’s been hassled over the years for doing this.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

Valley Friends Meeting sees solar as better stewardship

Part of Quakers’ beliefs include stewardship and – upon listening to the divine within themselves and others – the group began to feel a need to do something about climate destabilization. In 2014, they put out a statement to invite other religious groups and communities to make an effort toward reducing their carbon footprint on the environment. Having already done an energy audit on their meeting house, one member said, “Are we going to put our money where our mouth is?”

New pedal-powered compost business giveth, and taketh away

Rummaging through a bright yellow bucket filled with kale scraps, orange rinds and coffee grounds, Nidhi Vinod gives the go-ahead to dump the contents into a compost bin tucked into a corner of the parking lot by the Turner Pavilion downtown. She hands the bucket to Amelia Morrison who cleans it and places it back on the trailer which is attached to a bicycle. They grab the next bucket and check it for non-compostable items before adding it to the mix of kitchen scraps, fruit peelings, bio plastics and paper napkins.

Looking For A Home

“Residentially impaired” is how Dylan Thompson describes his living situation at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church. The church rotates with 15 other places of worship in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County that take in homeless guests as part of Open Doors.

Super Gr8, Harrisonburg’s film festival “unlike any other” wraps up its 2018 edition tonight

The 9th edition of Harrisonburg’s “film festival unlike any other” opened downtown. Beginning at 7pm tonight, 15 more three-minute films shot on classic Super 8 film will premiere at the 2019 festival’s second and final evening.

Fresh and local and all grown-up: a look at a movement with staying power

You hear about the local food movement and buy fresh buy local, but can you put a figure on the local food economy in our area? Nearly all of the restaurants in downtown Harrisonburg source locally grown food for ingredients on their menus. Harrisonburg City Schools have a $100,000 budget for locally purchased foods for school meals that come from within 100 miles of the city. Andrea Early, executive director of school nutrition for Harrisonburg’s schools, says that serving local foods helps kids make that connection between the food and who grows it. She hopes that by educating kids about healthy eating they will make healthier choices as adults.

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