Category: Harrisonburg Issues

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Harrisonburg’s housing crunch leads to fewer homes on the market — and those that are don’t stick around long

Soon, perhaps even later today, Wes Way hopes he will have signed the contract on a home in the Northeast neighborhood. But he’s had to get creative to do it.
Way is one of the prospective buyers scrambling to find a home before it gets snapped up in Harrisonburg’s tight market. Knowing the seller can be a boon to buyers, as homes tend to be on the market for a matter of days, or sometimes hours, before going under contract.

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Fresh produce, good books and a dash of ingenuity from JMU dietetics students becomes a recipe for success

A community program designed to help families get fresh fruits and vegetables is now taking a new approach thanks to the help of two JMU dietetics students, who spent a year trying to solve a problem of how to introduce families to using produce they’ve never cooked with before.

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City spending on incarceration continues to climb

Harrisonburg’s total cost to prosecute, try and incarcerate people has risen by $1.8 million – roughly 29 percent – over the past five years, according to city finance documents.

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Tiller Strings: sales, rentals, repair, sheet music, accessories.

As Habana Cafe nears opening, owner hopes to carry on Artful Dodger’s legacy

The Habana Cafe — the newest addition to Harrisonburg’s nightlife scene, and one with a distinct Latin flair — could open as early as Saturday in the place of one of the city’s longtime institutions, the Artful Dodger.

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Tricky negotiations on city schools’ solar project near resolution, though total size now significantly smaller

A high-profile solar project put forth by the Harrisonburg City Public Schools (HCPS) is one step closer to being finalized after a months-long, three-way dance between the school board, solar developer Secure Futures, and the Harrisonburg Electric Commission (HEC).

Efforts to change how Virginia public universities ask about prospective students’ criminal histories spread to JMU

Two-thirds of former inmates stop filling out college applications when they see a question about criminal history, according to one survey. Now a student group at JMU is working to change that, and JMU is tweaking how it asks about criminal histories of prospective students — all an offshoot of broader efforts in Virginia and across the country.

Council backs off intersection ordinance after torrent of public concern about its effect on those who rely on panhandling

City council members voted unanimously to table a proposed ordinance that would prohibit pedestrians from lingering in the medians at seven major intersections, after a heated public discussion that stretched Tuesday’s meeting beyond four-and-a-half hours.

Justice planner included in proposed city budget that will get a public hearing at tonight’s council meeting

A tiny fraction of the proposed $274 million city budget amounts to a big deal for community groups that have been calling for reforms in the local criminal justice system.

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